FacebookTwittericon-youtubeicon-wordpress

670-logo

Science News

  1. Mission Complete: Rosetta says farewell with comet crash-landing

    A monitor shows the discontinuation of a radio signal of the Rosetta spacecraft at the control room in the European Space Agency's headquarters in DarmstadtBy Victoria Bryan BERLIN (Reuters) - The Rosetta spacecraft ended its historic mission on Friday, crashing on the surface of the dusty, icy comet it has spent 12 years chasing in a hunt that has provided insight into the early days of the solar system and captured the public's imagination. Scientists in the European Space Agency control center in Darmstadt, Germany, clapped and hugged as confirmation of the end of the mission came at 1119 GMT. Rosetta completed its free-fall descent at the speed of a sedate walk, joining the probe Philae, which landed on the comet in November 2014 in what was considered a remarkable feat of precision space travel.


  2. Billionaire Elon Musk outlines plans for humans to colonize Mars

    SpaceX CEO Elon Musk unveils his plans to colonize Mars during the International Astronautical Congress in GuadalajaraBy Irene Klotz GUADALAJARA, Mexico (Reuters) - SpaceX is developing a massive rocket and capsule to transport large numbers of people and cargo to Mars with the ultimate goal of colonizing the planet, company chief and tech billionaire Elon Musk said on Tuesday. Musk outlined his plans for the Mars rocket, capable of carrying 100 passengers plus cargo per voyage, even as SpaceX is still investigating why a different rocket carrying a $200 million Israeli satellite blew up on a launch pad in Florida earlier this month. SpaceX intends to fly to Mars about every 26 months when Earth and Mars are favorably aligned.


  3. Scientists fix fractures with 3D-printed synthetic bone

    By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists in the United States have successfully treated broken spines and skulls in animals using 3D-printed synthetic bone, opening the possibility of future personalized bone implants for humans to fix dental, spinal other bone injuries. Unlike real bone grafts, the synthetic material - called hyper-elastic bone - is able to regenerate bone without the need for added growth factors, is flexible and strong, and can be easily and rapidly deployed in the operating room. Giving details in a teleconference, the scientists said the results of their animal trials - published on Wednesday in the Science Translational Medicine journal - were "quite astounding".
  4. Hubble spots evidence of water plumes on Jupiter's moon Europa

    This Jan. 26, 2014 image provided by NASA shows a composite image of possible water plumes on the south pole of Jupiter's moon Europa. Europa is among several moons in the solar system where evidence of an underground ocean has been discovered in recent years. The Hubble data were taken on January 26, 2014. The image of Europa, superimposed on the Hubble data, is assembled from data from the Galileo and Voyager missions. (NASA via AP)Astronomers on Monday said they have spotted evidence of water vapor plumes rising from Jupiter's moon Europa, a finding that might make it easier to learn whether life exists in the warm, salty ocean hidden beneath its icy surface. The apparent plumes detected by the Hubble Space Telescope shoot about 125 miles (200 km) above Europa's surface before, presumably, raining material back down onto the moon's surface, NASA said. Europa, considered one of the most promising candidates for life in the solar system beyond Earth, boasts a global ocean with twice as much water as in all of Earth's seas hidden under a layer of extremely cold and hard ice of unknown thickness.


  5. Scientists find new fat clues in faeces

    By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists in Britain have found a new link between the diversity of bacteria in human poo - the human fecal microbiome - and levels of harmful types of body fat. In research that may help explain why excessive weight problems and obesity tend to run in families, the scientists said high levels of visceral fat - which is linked to risks of chronic disease - were linked to having a relatively small range of bacteria in faeces. People with a high diversity of bacteria in their faeces had lower levels of visceral fat, according to the study published on Monday in the journal Genome Biology.

ZenoRadioBanner

Facebookbanner-twitter670 BlogYoutube

Citizenship Now Banner

AIDS Walk Los Angeles is a 10K fundraising walk starting and ending in Grand Park

FacebookTwittericon-youtubeicon-wordpress

rezaGoharzadBanner

Internet Marketing Services by Cyberset, a Los Angeles Internet Marketing Company